To be fair, critiques are difficult

Whither scene? It may seem archaic, but I prefer to know where something is taking place. Consider, as an opening sentence for a chapter: 

"The morning sky was overcast, but it failed to mute the constant din of activity in the port of Lisbon as Lord De La Warr and the former Marchioness disembarked."

Or:

"As Lord De La Warr and the former Marchioness disembarked, the morning sky was overcast, and failed to mute the constant din of activity in the port of Lisbon."

No, no, no, no.

I prefer to know the setting in which the characters move. Yes, the characters are the important part of the story, and in the second example, they are the subject of the sentence. Very well and good.

And very, very wrong.

You see (and you probably do), in the first example, there are multiple "things" going on. In addition to setting the scene, so that the characters aren't floating in emptiness, there is a contrast between the overcast sky and the din of activity. Also, the former can't mute the latter, apparently. 

Then, the characters are added to the sentence, where a literary transfer from the first part of the sentence setting the scene should be (perhaps subconsciously) added to the characters themselves. This will probably be missed. But it is there, and was intentional.

That is how I write. It may be wrong (according to the critique I received last Tuesday), but I think it more suited to this style of fiction. I think it could work in other styles as well. But the author has to aim for more than just simplicity and economy of style. 

That is, if one wants to have any style at all!